college_debt

The Cost of College Becoming More and More Expensive

In 2018, about fourteen point eight million people enrolled into a public university and five point thirteen into a private university. Each college on average, I would like to say, charges for tuition about twenty to thirty thousand, mind you I’m just talking about tuition so far. So that’s not even including room and board, meal plans, books, and the many other numbers that go into your total cost of around fifty grand per year and to some colleges a semester. With all those numbers, I don’t know about you but it seems pretty expensive and those numbers aren’t ideal to many parents nor students who may or may not have to get a loan to even attend the college at which they will receive hopefully the degree of their choice. Not to mention that’s not even including FAFSA which may not even be enough for the student to cover the entire cost of school. In the “College Debt: An Exploratory Study of Risk Factors Among College Freshmen,” by Linda Simpson she quotes the “Freshmen Finance” by saying, “survey conducted by Harris Interactive (2005) found that 80% of parents and 83% of students anticipate they will have debt as a result of college costs.” If you haven’t noticed that survey was from 2005, now just imagine those numbers are probably even higher with the cost of college going up consistently. With college becoming more and more expensive and the debt rate constantly going up yearly students are taking out more loans, middle class families aren’t able to not only get aid but also face the hard decision of to send their child to college, and how it will affect the college graduates after college.

It has come to be very clear that college hasn’t gotten any cheaper and it seems it has only gotten more expensive over the years and as a result students or parents are having to borrow more and more money which puts them into debt. “According to the institute for college access and success (TICAS) project on student debt, the average student borrower with $26,000 in the red. While we’ve all heard the screaming headlines of graduates with crippling debt of $100,000 or more, this is the case for only 1% of graduates. That said, one in 10 graduate accumulate more than $40,000.” (Denhart, para. 1) To know that the average borrower is already almost 30 grand in the “red” says a lot of not only how much students are going into debt but multiply that times 4 years. The number only seems to get scarier. And as for the $100,000 in debt students those are usually the students that go to most likely to medical school and to think that this number is constantly evolving is crazy. All these cost put a ton of stress on students and to know that a student at the age of eighteen could be in debt about 30 grand isn’t right. They are just starting out in life, yet they have a loan following them for a very long time.

Furthermore, middle- class families have the hardest time out of it all. Middle class families between the incomes of $50,000-$100,000 can’t seem to get qualify for FAFSA or grants by their own state. The government seems to think they have enough money to send their child off to college but what they don’t know is that they don’t at all. Most of that “$100,000” goes towards paying for things a family needs like paying the bills, groceries, taxes and etc. So the parent and the child are forced to make to the choices of either getting a ton of loans to pay for the university, go to a community college, or just do not go to college at all. As a middle- class student I know first hand how it feels to literally be stuck in the middle of not being able to afford a 4 year but still have enough money to live a blessed life. In the article, “Can the middle class afford college?” by Jeffrey Salingo who quote’s Daniel Porterfield who is the president of Franklin and Marshall College, and national leader on improving financial aid for low-income families by saying, “We need to expand opportunity and aid policies for both Pell students and middle-income students who are not pell-eligible.” With universities increasing their cost constantly and family incomes not really changing it makes the problem even worse when it comes to sending the child to college because they will most likely feel forced to get that loan, which increases the overall student debt of this country.

Now that the student has finally graduated what are they left with? I mean yes they got an amazing degree but what about those loans that they possibly have from these 4 hard working years of school. With that degree comes the stress of “How am I going to pay these off, I dont have have the money and I have other things I need to pay off.” They don’t seem to pay it off immediately so they start paying it off in payments or in whatever way they seem fit to pay it off but what about starting off their life finally by possibly buying a home or etc. The thing is they can’t. In the article, “College is more expensive than it’s ever been, and the 5 reasons why it’s only going to get worse”, by Hilary Hoffman she quotes a man by the name of Josh Kirdy who works multiple jobs to pay off his student loans of $77,000. Hilary Hoffman also quotes another woman who graduated with about $25,000 in debt says, “I feel like buying a house is a total pipe dream at this point in my life, but I’m tightening my belt as much as possible to save for a down payment.” These quotes show how people are struggling after college due to these loans they have to pay off due to the expensiveness of college.

In closing, as college tuition gets higher and higher, the more of a barrier goes up for our future generations. In the article, “Why is American Higher Education So Expensive?” by Frank Wu he expresses how, “It is important for all of us who are about the future of the nation to address the high cost of higher education. But it is especially imperative for those of us in particular who care about the values we celebrate, of the possibility of human progress through intellectual inquiry, to answer the question: why is American higher education so expensive?” This quote shows how we need to be more concerned about how expensive college is getting because it doesn’t seem to be getting any cheaper and I don’t know about you but I’m not getting any richer. The solution to this issue would be for colleges to place a cap on tuition or for FAFSA to increase the incomes so that more families can receive more money for their kids to go off to college because if not more and more generations will not be able to attend college at all.

Works Cited

Denhart, Chris. “How the $1.2 Trillion College Debt Crisis Is Crippling Students, Parents and the Economy.” Forbes, Forbes Special Features, 13 Aug. 2013,

Simpson, Linda; Smith, Renee; Taylor, Lisa; and Chadd, Julie A., “College Debt: An Exploratory Study of Risk Factors Among College Freshmen” (2012). Faculty Research & Creative Activity. 15.

Wu, Frank H. “Why Is American Higher Education So Expensive?” The Huffington Post, TheHuffingtonPost.com, 3 Dec. 2016,

Hoffower, Hillary. “College Is More Expensive than It’s Ever Been, and the 5 Reasons Why Suggest It’s Only Going to Get Worse.” Business Insider, Business Insider, 8 July 2018,

Selingo, Jeffrey J. “Perspective | Can the Middle Class Afford College?” The Washington Post, WP Company, 8 May 2017,
Annotated Bibliography

Denhart, Chris. “How the $1.2 Trillion College Debt Crisis Is Crippling Students, Parents and the Economy.” Forbes, Forbes Special Features, 13 Aug. 2013,

In this article by Forbes, it explains some of the very big  and scary numbers of student debt that are crippling students and their parents as well. It breaks down the average of how much each student is borrowing from from either a public, private, and even a community college. I’m using this source to explain exactly how much us as students are going in debt yearly, and as well as the entire country.

Simpson, Linda; Smith, Renee; Taylor, Lisa; and Chadd, Julie A., “College Debt: An Exploratory Study of Risk Factors Among College Freshmen” (2012). Faculty Research & Creative Activity. 15. h

In this book, it explains how much students are going in debt with statistics and examining how students can try to prevent student loans and what exactly a student can do to prevent loans from college. I will using this source to explain how these loans will affect students future decisions that are even past college. The reliability of this source is that it is a study from Eastern Illinois University.

Wu, Frank H. “Why Is American Higher Education So Expensive?” The Huffington Post, TheHuffingtonPost.com, 3 Dec. 2016,

In this article by Frank Wu, he addresses how paying for college has been persay, “priced out” by the middle class and 5 reasons why school has become so expensive and why it is affecting the people’s pockets so much. The 5 reasons are the loss of state support, regulations and rankings, availability of student loans, executive and staff bloat and inefficiency, and lastly, buildings. I will be using this source to explain why higher education is so expensive. The reliability of this resource is that he is a professor himself.
Hoffower, Hillary. “College Is More Expensive than It’s Ever Been, and the 5 Reasons Why Suggest It’s Only Going to Get Worse.” Business Insider, Business Insider, 8 July 2018,

In this article by Hillary Hoffman she describes different people’s point of views and how they are held back from really getting further in their life due to their student loans holding them back from the things they want in life like a home. She also describes how college tuition has really increased since the 1980’s. I’m using this article to talk about the different people’s perspectives after they graduated from college and how they deal with the student debt they now carry. The reliability of this source is that she talks to actual people that have student debt issues and how it affects them financially.

Selingo, Jeffrey J. “Perspective | Can the Middle Class Afford College?” The Washington Post, WP Company, 8 May 2017,

In this article by Jeffrey Selingo he goes into detail about how the middle-class is having a very hard time sending their children off to college and if they do send to a 4-year university it affects them heavily financially due to the high loans they have to take out. He also goes into detail about how FAFSA and the states give little to none grants to middle-class students as well based off of their parent income. I use this article to show how middle-class families are literally stuck in the middle of whether to send their child to college or not. The reliability of this source is that he is a professor at Arizona State University.
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